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Articles tagged with: Linux

Humour, IT »

[28 Aug 2017 | Comments Off on man page humour | 128 views]

Found this little nugget in the “find” man page recently:
A ‘%’ character followed by any other character is discarded, but the other character is printed (don’t rely on this, as further format characters may be introduced). A ‘%’ at the end of the format argument causes undefined behaviour since there is no following character. In some locales, it may hide your door keys, while in others it may remove the final page from the novel you are reading.
Reminds me of a T-shirt I have:

$> man woman
$> Segmentation fault (core dumped)

IT, Opinion »

[26 Nov 2014 | Comments Off on Deleting files under Linux/Unix | 489 views]

Today I came across a comment on a blog post related to deleting files on a Unix/Linux system that was a clear case of bullshit. I tried to post a comment to that effect on the blog in question, but the comment feature was broken. So, since I had already gone to the trouble of writing my response, and since I don’t post nearly as much to my own blog as I would like, I’ll just post it here instead.
To PoorMe, who claimed to have “just lost all of [his/her] …

IT »

[8 Apr 2014 | Comments Off on Goodbye Windows! Goodbye Google! | 641 views]

The day is finally here! It’s 8 April 2014, and support for Windows XP has ended. Years ago — I really don’t remember how many — I swore that XP would be the last version of Windows that I’d run. Not because XP was any worse than versions of Windows before it; on the contrary, having finally reached a level of acceptable stability with Windows 2000, XP continued that and I was generally happy, although that happiness (contentedness, rather) has been badly tinged in the last couple of years by …

IT »

[28 Nov 2010 | Comments Off on Installing Zend Optimiser | 483 views]

I had a bit of an education on the confusing array of Zend products recently. A client needed Zend Optimizer (which, of course, Zend spells with a “z” to cater to the all-powerful American market) installed on their virtual private server (running Linux, of course), as the installation routine for a web application wouldn’t proceed without it. Fair enough. Some web applications are encoded so that they can’t be hacked (as opposed to cracked; see the difference), reverse engineered, modified, etc., and Zend Optimiser interprets the encoded PHP files so …